The Adaptive Process

The assumption that the fruits of adaptation includes:

  1. Resilience
  • Jung, C. (1954). Development of Personality. Volume 17 in The Collected Works of Jung. London: Routledge.
  • Kohut, H. (2009). The Analysis of the Self. University of Chicago Press.

  1. Recovery
  • Erikson, E. (1985). Childhood and Society. New York: W.W. Norton.
  • Konner, M. (2010). The Evolution of Childhood: relationships, emotion, mind. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

  1. Resourcefulness
  • Brooks, R. & Goldstein, S. (2001). Raising Resilient Children. New York: Contemporary Books.
  • Goleman, D. (1996). Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, New York: Bantam Books.

Th assumption that the key to adaptation is sadness and tears:

  • Frey, W. (1985). Crying: the mystery of tears. Minneapolis: Winston Press.
  • Konner, M. (2010). The Evolution of Childhood: relationships, emotion, mind. Cambridge: Harvard University Press
  • Vingerhoet, A. (2013). Why only humans weep: unraveling the mystery of tears”.  Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Rogers, C.H., Floyd, F.J., Seltzer, M.M., Greenberg, J., Hong, J. (2008). Long-term effects of the death of a child on parents’ adjustment in midlife. J Fam Psychol. 2008;22:203–211. (“the same investigation showed that recovery from grief was linked with deepened purpose in life.”)

The assumption that aggression is the result of a lack of adaptation:

  • Dollard, J., Doob, L.W., Neal E. Miller, N.E.., Mowrer, O.H. and Sears, R.R.(1939). Frustration and Aggression. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Panksepp, J. (2012). The Archeology of Mind: neuroevolutionary origins of human emotions. New York, Norton.
  • Sears, R. (1941). Non-Aggressive Reactions to Frustration, Psychological Review, 48, 343-346.

The assumption that conventional discipline does not help reduce aggression, and may even strengthen it:

  • Kohn, A. (2006). Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.