Key Insights about Emotions

 

  1. THE PURPOSE OF EMOTION IS TO MOVE US

  2. EMOTION IS ELECTRICAL IN NATURE< OBEYING ITS LAWS

  3. EACH EMOTION HAS SPECIFIC WORK TO DO

    • The attachment seeking response as the most immediate reaction on the sense of danger

      Bowlby, R. (2007). Babies and toddlers in non-parental daycare can avoid stress and anxiety if they develop a lasting secondary attachment bond with one carer who is consistently accessible to them. Attachment & Human Development, 9(4), 307-319.

  4. EMOTIONS NEED SUFFICIENT REST IN ORDER TO CONTINUE TO WORK EFFECTIVELY

  5. EMOTIONS NEED TO BE FULLY FELT TO COMPLETE THEIR WORK OF ADAPTATION AND GROWTH

  6. EMOTIONS NEED TO BE RESOLVED IN SOME WAY OR ANOTHER OR THEY WILL GET STUCK AND STALE

  7. EMOTIONS SEEK DISCHARGE THROUGH EXPRESSION WHICH,  IF RESTRICTED, CAN ADVERSELY AFFECT EMOTIONAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

  8. THE EMOTIONAL SYSTEM TAKES MANY YEARS AND CONDUCIVE CONDITIONS TO FULLY DEVELOP

    • During the long maturation process, when children are under the care of guardians, their emotions, instincts and impulses slowly begin to be under their system of intention

      Jun, P. (2018). The importance of play: An interview with Dr. Jaak Panksepp. Retrieved from https://brainworldmagazine.com/the-importance-of-play-an-interview- with-dr-jaak-panksepp/ 

 

The role of emotions in healthy development:

  • Damasio, A. (2005). Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain, revised Penguin edition.
  • James, W. (1884). What is an Emotion?. Mind, 9, 188-205.
  • Whitebread, D. (2012). Developmental psychology and early childhood education: A guide for students and practitioners. London, United Kingdom: Sage.

Attuned emotional attachment as a precursor to improved learning and behaviour:

  • Bergin, C., & Bergin, D. (2009). Attachment in the Classroom. Educational Psychology Review, 21, 141-170.
  • Commodari, E. (2013). Preschool teacher attachment, school readiness and risk of learning difficulties. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 28, 123-133. 
  • Dubinsky, J. M. (2010). Neuroscience Education for Prekindergarten-12 Teachers. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30, (24):8057-8060. 
  • Geddes, H. (2003). Attachment and the child in school. Part 1. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 8:3, 231-242.
  • Geddes, H. (2005). Attachment and Learning. Part 2. The Learning Profile of the Avoidant and Disorganised Attachment Patterns. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 10:2, 79-93. 
  • Hook, C. J., & Farah, M. J. (2012). Neuroscience for Educators: What are they seeking and what are they finding? Centre for Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania. 
  • Howard-Jones, P. (2014). Evolutionary perspectives on mind, brain and education. International Mind, Brain and Education Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc., 8, No. 1., 21-33. 
  • Howard-Jones, P. (2014). Neuroscience and education: myths and messages. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, October 15, 2014. 
  • Wetz, J. (2010). Is initial teacher training failing to meet the needs of all our young people? Bristol, UK: CFBT Education Trust.