The Emergent Process

A) The assumption that if conditions are conducive, a child is moved to become increasingly more viable as a separate being:

  • Brazelton, T.B. and Greenspan, S. (2000). The Irreducible Needs Of Children: What Every Child Must Have To Grow, Learn, And Flourish. Dacapo Press, Perseus Books Group.
  • Erikson, E. (1985). Childhood and Society. New York: W.W. Norton.
  • Kohn, A. (2018). Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes. Houghton Mifflin 
  • Rogers, C. (1995). On Becoming A Person. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

B) The assumption that the emergent process is responsible for a host of wonderful characteristics including curiosity, independence, responsibility, a sense of agency, emergent play and much more:

  • Bronfenbrenner, U, ed. (2005). Making Human Beings Human – Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development.  New York: Sage Publications.
  • Erikson, E. (1985). Childhood and Society W.W. Norton, New York
  • Kohn, A. (2018). Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Kohut, H. (2009). The Analysis of the Self. University of Chicago Press.
  • Maslow, A. (1968). Toward a Psychology of Being, (1st edition, 1962; 2nd edition, 1968)
  • Rogers, C. (1995). On Becoming A Person. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

C) The assumption that the main impediments to the emergent process are our typical responses when children are missing the fruit of emergence:  

  • Dawson, G. and Fischer, K.W. (1994). Human Behavior and the Developing Brain. New York: The Guildford Press. 
  • Deci, E. 1995. Why We Do What We Do: Understanding Self-Motivation . New York: Penguin Books.
  • Kohn, A. 2018. Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes. Houghton Mifflin.
  • Lepper, M.R., Greene, D., & Nisbett, R.E. 1973. Undermining children’s intrinsic interest with extrinsic rewards: A test of the over-justification hypothesis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 28, 129-37.