Attachment as Wound or Shield

Attachment and physical health of adolescent children:

  • Wickrama, K.A., Lorenz, F.O., Conger, R.D. (1997). Parental support and adolescent physical health status: a latent growth-curve analysis. J Health Soc Behav, Jun;38(2):149-63. (“The results provide evidence for the influence of parental support on adolescent physical health, both directly and indirectly through the adolescent’s perception of that support.”)

Reversing defendedness – importance explained:

  • Freud, S. (1901). Psychopathology of Everyday Life, W. W. Norton & Company
  • Freud, A. (1971).  Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (The Writings of Anna Freud, Vol 2) International Universities Press 
  • Bowlby, J. (1980). Loss: Sadness & Depression. Attachment and Loss (vol. 3); (International psycho-analytical library no.109). London: Hogarth Press. 
  • Ainsworth, M. (1978). Patterns of Attachment: A Psychological Study of the Strange Situation. Erlbaum.

Protecting, shielding, leading:

  • Brazelton, T. Berry and Greenspan, Stanley. (2000). The Irreducible Needs Of Children: What Every Child Must Have To Grow, Learn, And Flourish Dacapo Press, Perseus Books Group
  • Panksepp, J. (2012). The Archeology of Mind: neuroevolutionary origins of human emotions. New York, Norton.
  • Rogers, C. (1995). On Becoming A Person Houghton Mifflin, New York
  • Schore, A. (1994).  Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self: The Neurobiology of Emotional Development.  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
  • Resnick, M. et al. (1997). Protecting Adolescents from Harm: findings from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health, Journal of the American Medical Association September.
  • Winnicott, D. W. (1965). Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment: Studies in the Theory of Emotional Development London: Hogarth Press
  • DiCenso, Alba, Guyatt, G., Willan, A.  & Griffith, L. (2002). Intervention to reduce unintended pregnancies among adolescents: systematic review of randomized controlled trials. British Medical Journal in June 2002 (Vol 324).
  • Clowes, G. A. (2000). Home-Educated Students Rack Up Honours. School Reform news, July.

Collecting our children (cultivating a working relationship by engaging a child’s attachment instincts):

  • Bowlby, J. (1982). Attachment: Second Edition. New York: Basic Books.
  • Ainsworth, M. and Bowlby, J. (1965). Child Care and the Growth of Love. Penguin Books.
  • Fisher, H. (1992). Anatomy of Love. Ballantine Books.

Compensating for stuckness:

  • Kohn, A. (2005). Unconditional Parenting: Moving from Rewards and Punishments to Love and Reason. Atria Books.
  • Kohn, A. (2006). Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
  • Kohn, A. (2018). Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes. Houghton Mifflin.
  • Wright, K. (1997). Babies, Bonds and Brains Discover Magazine, October.

Bridging anything that could divide:

  • Brazelton, T. Berry and Greenspan, Stanley. (2000). The Irreducible Needs Of Children: What Every Child Must Have To Grow, Learn, And Flourish Dacapo Press, Perseus Books Group
  • Panksepp, J. (2012). The Archeology of Mind: neuroevolutionary origins of human emotions. New York, Norton.

Matchmaking – using existing attachments:

  • Bowlby, J. (1982). Attachment: Second Edition. New York: Basic Books.
  • Ainsworth, M. D. S., & Marvin, R. S. (1995). On the shaping of attachment theory and research: An interview with Mary D. S. Ainsworth (Fall 1994). Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 60(2-3), p. 3–21.

Psychological / physical violence from parents and well-being:

  • Greenfield, E.A., Marks, N.F. (2010). Identifying experiences of physical and psychological violence in childhood that jeopardize mental health in adulthood. Child Abuse Negl. 34, p. 161–171.
  • Bell, L.G., Bell, D.C. (2005). Family dynamics in adolescence affect midlife well-being. J Fam Psychol., 19:198–207. (“Family dynamics – connection and individuation in the family system- during adolescence predicted adult well-being in midlife.”)

Even after spending a few months in preschool (given time to adjust), children exhibit cortisol levels in day-care than at home

  • Drugli, M. B., Solheim, E., Lydersen, S., Moe, V., Smith, L., & Berg-Nielsen, T. S. (2018). Elevated cortisol levels in Norwegian toddlers in childcare. Early Child Development and Care, 188(12), 1684–1695.
  • Vermeer, H. J., & van Ijzendoorn, M. H. (2006). Children’s elevated cortisol levels at daycare: A review and meta-analysis. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 21, p.390– 401.

In preschool children can have a safe attachment what will contribute to their lower level of stress

  • Bowlby, R. (2007). Babies and toddlers in non-parental daycare can avoid stress and anxiety if they develop a lasting secondary attachment bond with one carer who is consistently accessible to them. Attachment & Human Development, 9(4), p.307-319.